Agreement For The Prevention Of Incidents On And Over The High Seas

Agreement For The Prevention Of Incidents On And Over The High Seas

The 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea provides that `the coastal State of the exclusive economic zone shall have sovereign rights for the purposes of the research and exploitation, conservation and management of the natural resources, whether living or not, of the waters above the seabed and the seabed and their subsoil` (Article 56). Geopolitical tensions between the United States and Russia have fluctuated sharply since 1972, but even at the height of the Cold War, these agreements lowered the temperature. They must continue to do so, and the United States should use all diplomatic levers to ensure that it continues to serve the common interests of both states. Russia cannot be effectively embarrassed or intimidated publicly, but it has a long history of tactical caution. The U.S. should prioritize incSEA and DMA talks with Russia by requesting a bilateral investigation into un professional or uncertain interactions. Just as Russian reconnaissance aircraft continue to fly without illegal interference in the U.S. Air Identification Zone (ADIZ) around North America, the U.S. should insist that Russia abides by the same rules for U.S.

and NATO aircraft in the Baltic and Black Seas. In the absence of jointly developed standards of conduct, uncertainty will creep into the operating room, which could have catastrophic unintended consequences ranging from an accidental collision to a rapid escalation of the conflict. collection of information. For example, the Chinese government has banned the collection of information within its EEZ because this information could be used in an armed conflict. Therefore, this type of activity would directly harm the national security of the country. The Parties shall exchange appropriate information on collisions, incidents causing damage or any other incident at sea between the Parties` ships and aircraft. The United States Navy provides this information through the Soviet Naval Attaché in Washington, and the Soviet Navy provides this information through the United States Naval Attaché in Moscow. The incident involving Donald Cook, as well as a series of other incidents that have been imagined in the last two years since the beginning of the Ukrainian crisis, are further proof that foreign reactions to fairly routine events are often unnecessarily alarmist. Unfortunately, the Baltic Sea region is beginning to enter the center of the conflict of interest between Russia and NATO members, including the United States. Washington will not abandon demonstrative accusations aimed at showing its support for its allies, especially those who, traditionally, tend to see Russia only as a threat.


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