Delhi Agreement 1952 Gktoday

Delhi Agreement 1952 Gktoday

Liaquat Ali Khan was the Prime Minister of Pakistan when pandit Jawaharlal Nehru signed an agreement in Delhi in 1950. The Delhi Pact is commonly known as the Nehru-Liaquat Pact. The agreement was signed in the context of large-scale migration of members of minority communities between the two countries following attacks by majority communities on their respective territories. This chapter describes Nehrus` note to Abdullah of August 14, 1952; how Sheikh Abdullah asked the Constituent Assembly to approve the Delhi Agreement and its response to the debate of 19 August 1952. It also presents the report of the drafting committee and the Assembly`s resolution on the head of state; Nehrus notes for Sheikh Abdullah in Sonamarg; President Rajendra Prasad`s note to the Prime Minister on Article 370; The bill amending the constitution of the state, November 3, 1952; and Mirza Muhammad Afzal Beg`s request to move the assembly for the passage of the law on 10 November. The second part of the chapter presents constitutional amendments 39 and 42 and Regulation 44 for Jammu and Kashmir. In his response, Swaran Singh stated that the 1950 Nehru-Liaquat Pact was a permanent agreement between India and Pakistan. It obliges each country to ensure that its minorities enjoy full equality of citizenship with others and receive the same treatment as other nationals of their country. The Delhi Agreement, 1952 Kashmir government representatives with representatives of the Indian government and came to an agreement to support the main decisions of the Constituent Assembly of the State J-K. This agreement later became known as the Delhi Agreement, 1952. The main features of this agreement were: I.

Given the uniform and consistent attitude of the Constituent Assembly of Jammu and Kashmir, that sovereignty remains in the state in all matters other than those mentioned in the accession instrument, the Indian government has agreed that the powers of the legislative power to be transferred to the Centre with respect to all other states. , with the exception of Jammu and Kashmir. in the latter case, they delegated to the state itself; ii. It was agreed between the two governments that persons residing in Jammu and Kashmir are considered citizens of India under Article 5 of the Indian Constitution, but that the state legislator was allowed to legislate on “state decisions of 1927 and 1932” to delegate special rights and privileges to “subjects of the state.” : the state legislator was also allowed to legislate for “state subjects” who travelled to Pakistan because of the municipal unrest of 1947, in the event of a return to Kashmir; iii. Since the Indian president enjoys the same respect in the state as in other Indian units, articles 52 to 62 of the Constitution concerning him should apply to the state. It was also agreed that the power to grant pardons, pardons and punishments, etc.; would also be the president of India iv.


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